Sound Teaching

This is the teaching site of the West Side church of Christ in Fort Worth, TX. Unless otherwise indicated, all materials were written and prepared by Stan Cox

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Masonry and the Christian

ImageThe above title is that of a book written by Robert L. McDonald. He wrote this exposé of the Masonic Lodge in 1974, having diligently researched a number of authoritative Masonic works written by 32 and 33 degree Masons such as Albert Pike and Albert G. Mackey.

It is interesting that most of the Masons brother McDonald talked with were ignorant of or disagreed with the things he uncovered. This is evident from the following quote, from page 10 of his book:

“As we read from these Masonic authorities, I want to make it very clear that I am not charging all Masons with believing what is found in these authentic books. Most Masons, with whom I have talked for any length of time, inform me they do not believe some particular point as covered in the documented material.”

(Masonry and the Christian, page 10)

However, brother McDonald made an important point in the same paragraph:

Because one is a Mason and happens to be uninformed about a particular point of Masonry, it doesn’t mean that such is not propagated in Masonry.

(ibid.)

An examination of the lodge quickly reveals it to be much more than a simple service organization as is so often assumed. It is a quasi-religious organization of which no Christian should be a part. Consider the following script that is followed during the initiation of a candidate into the lodge:

Mr. _________ who has long been in darkness, and now seeks to be brought to light, and to receive a part in the rights and benefits of this worshipful Lodge, erected to God, and dedicated to the holy Sts. John, as all brothers and fellows have done before.”

(quoted from Masonry and the Christian, page 15).

This initiation rite itself shows the religious nature of the Masonic Lodge. One wonders what is meant by the contention that the initiate was once in darkness and now seeks to be brought to light. It is so similar to the statement of John in John 1:9, who describes Jesus as the “true Light which gives light to every man coming into the world.”

The lodge leader is called the “Worshipful Master.” the Lodge in the initiation speech above is said to be erected to God. All of this is unknown to scripture, and a Christian’s involvement in it is without divine authority.

It is Christ through whom we are given “every spiritual blessing in the heavenly places” (cf. Ephesians 1:3). What are the rights and benefits are accrued to the initiate into the Lodge if not spiritual in nature? Though there are official Masonic prayers, they contain not a single reference to Jesus. Faith in Christ is not required to be a Mason. And yet, all in the Lodge are called brothers, and have been brought to the Light.

At the end of the initiation into the Lodge, the candidate is required to kneel at an altar, and having taken an oath, is directed by the “Worshipful Master” to kiss the Bible. This is an obvious act of worship, and an unscriptural and idolatrous act at that!

More than three decades have passed since brother McDonald wrote his book. I have no way of telling you whether the rites required of the initiate in the Lodge have changed in any way. I rather doubt that there has been a substantial change, but the question is irrelevant. The Lodge is a quasi-religious organization that exists without authority from God. A faithful Christian has no more business being a part of it than he does being a member of the Catholic church.

Ignorance on the part of the Mason is no excuse. A professed disagreement with certain aspects of Lodge doctrine likewise does not exonerate the Christian who holds such a dual allegiance with this carnal organization. Masonry claims that Lodge members from the various religions of the world “can assemble as brethren and unite in prayer to the one God (quoted from Masonry and the Christian, page 266). The apostle Paul says that such unity comes only through Jesus Christ (cf. Galatians 3:28). The two claims are incompatible.